Archive | September, 2009

September 28, 2009

28 Sep

A few weeks ago there was an article in the Los Angeles Times titled, “30 Days of Ripe Tomatoes: Tomatoes are arriving by the bushel now. Here’s how to make the most of the harvest.” My mom gave me the article and I felt like it spoke to me. Since our tomatoes are harvested ripe off the vine, we are constantly sorting “good” from “sauce” and then tossing the “bad” in to the field. As Russ Parsons, the LA Times writer says, “I am now swimming in tomatoes.” Every week for the summer you have been enjoying our Fairview’s amazing beauties, but last week, for the first time, I heard a few side comments about what to do with ALL these tomatoes. I decided it was time to help. In fact, that’s my job; I am here to help, well, at least to point you in the direction of help. Please check out the recipes section of the e-newsletter for Parsons’ “30 days of Ripe Tomatoes.” If you ever have questions about how to cook/use certain items in your share, please feel free to email me and I will do my best to help find you a recipe.

I continue to enjoy summer produce, even if its fall.

Jen Corey, Marketing Manager

Pre-used Paper Needed: Every day we print reports, documents, and newsletters on blank paper. Although we recycle, I feel it is not enough. We could be using “pre-used” or “scratch paper.” I am asking CSA members, to collect paper at home and work that has only been printed on one side and donate it to the farm. We take white or colored paper. Bring it by the paper bags or box loads. Drop off any time at CSA pick-up or the farm stand and it will make its way up to the office. Thank you in advance.

Volunteers Needed: We are looking for someone to work with the Executive Director on our donor data base. Experience with Filemaker Pro is necessary and 3 hours/wk commitment is appreciated. Please contact Jenny Milan, Executive Director of Fairview Gardens at jenny@fairviewgardens.org.

Upcoming Events:

What: Fresh Greens; dance to the new green beat… SBCC Adult Education Class presented by The Sustainability Project; and taught be CSA member and architect John D. Kelly

When: Tuesdays in October 2009, 5:30 – 7:00 pm

Where: The Faulkner Gallery, SB Central Library

Description: How can we thrive in a world of economic uncertainty, peak oil, and climate change? Hear personal stories about simple, affordable, everyday sustainable lifestyles and share your experiences with green living. Visit green homes and gardens.

Discuss how our ongoing crisis is an opportunity to create the next major green movement. For more information about each class see attached flyer or go to

http://www.sbcc.edu/adulted

What: Carbon Economy Series Santa Barbara presents Soil Food Web and Compost Technologies with Dr. Elaine Ingham

When: October 30-November 1, 2009

Where: Training at Orella Ranch, Gaviota Coast, north of Santa Barbara

Description: Restoring the Soil Food Web is essential to rebuilding soil health and productivity… In this course, you’ll look at the elements of a healthy soil food web, learn how to analyze and improve your own soil, and learn how to make composts and extracts to strengthen the Soil Food Web.  The Soil Food Web course provides knowledge and research findings for those at the grass roots level of working with soils.

For more information about registration go to:  www.CarbonEconomySB.com

Sneak Peek:

Small and Large Share (same stuff; different amounts)

Cherry tomatoes

Tomatoes

Summer Squash (try breaded and fried with fresh tomatoes lightly sautéed)

Green Beans

Pomegranate (to get seeds out without staining hands, do it in a bowl of water)

Peppers

Collards (sauté with garlic, onion, and balsamic vinegar for 10 to 20min… if you eat pork, bacon is good too)

Beets (roast with olive oil, salt and pepper at 350ºF till you can puncture easily with a fork. Good on salad with goat cheese or as a side dish)

Garlic

Recipes (from The Los Angeles Times, “30 Days of Tomatoes,” Sept. 9, 2009, by Russ Parsons): I bolded the ones that stood out to me…  

1. Pa’amb tomaquet: Split a baguette in half and cut it into 4- to 5-inch lengths. Toast the bread and while it is still hot, rub the cut side with a cut clove of garlic. Rub half of a seeded tomato against the bread, cut side to cut side, as if you were polishing the bread with the tomato. The bread will absorb a lot of tomato juice and soften slightly but stay crisp around the crust. Drizzle lightly with olive oil and season to taste with salt.

2. Pasta with fresh tomatoes: Cut cherry tomatoes in half and season with salt, pepper, olive oil, a little red wine vinegar and minced garlic and a pinch of dried red chile flakes. Cook bucatini, penne or another chewy dried pasta until tender. While the pasta is still steaming hot, dump it over the tomatoes. Stir quickly so the hot pasta will lightly cook the tomatoes. Stir in a bit more olive oil or, if you prefer, some fresh goat cheese, which will melt into the pasta.

3. Pasta with quickly cooked tomatoes (true marinara): Heat olive oil in a skillet over medium heat and sauté a whole peeled garlic clove until lightly browned. Add peeled, seeded, diced tomatoes and cook until they begin to melt into a sauce. Cook spaghetti or another long dried pasta and when it is almost tender, add it to the tomatoes along with a ladle of the cooking water. Increase the heat to high and cook until the sauce thickens and coats the pasta. Remove the garlic clove, sprinkle with shredded basil, and serve.

4. Pasta with tomato sauce: Heat olive oil in a skillet over medium heat with minced garlic and diced carrots, celery and onion (half as much carrots and celery as onion). When the vegetables start to soften and turn color, add peeled, seeded, diced tomatoes (preferably plum tomatoes) and cook until they’ve thoroughly melted into a sauce. Pass the mixture through a food mill (or purée in a food processor) and return to the skillet. Serve with fettuccine or another fresh pasta topped with grated Parmigiano-Reggiano.

5. Tomato butter: Heat a stick of butter in a skillet with minced shallots and torn fresh tarragon. Cut cherry tomatoes in quarters and put them in a mixing bowl with salt to taste. If the tomatoes lack acidity, stir in a bit of red wine vinegar. When the shallots have softened, pour the butter into the tomatoes, stirring briskly to break up the tomatoes. Serve this over grilled or sautéed fish or gnocchi.

6. Tomato and white bean salad: Halve cherry tomatoes and put them in a mixing bowl with minced garlic and capers. Season with olive oil, red wine vinegar and salt. Set aside for a half-hour to macerate. In another mixing bowl, combine a can of rinsed, drained white beans and some slivered red onion. Add the tomatoes and stir to combine. Top with slivered basil. To make this a light main course, stir in a drained can of good-quality tuna.

7. True gazpacho: Soak bread in water to soften. Purée the bread and a clove of garlic in a blender until smooth. Add seeded, chopped tomatoes, a little peeled, chopped cucumber and a little seeded bell pepper and purée. Season with salt, white wine vinegar, a little cumin and either a little black pepper or smoked paprika. With the blender running, add olive oil in a stream until the mixture turns from bright red to orange. Pour the mixture into a bowl and whisk in just enough ice water to make a lightly creamy texture. Chill until ready to serve.

8. Crostini with goat cheese and tomatoes: Cut a baguette in 1/2 -inch slices and place them on a cookie sheet. Toast at 400 degrees, turning once, until they are well-browned on both sides, about 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and immediately rub each slice lightly with cut garlic and drizzle with olive oil. Sprinkle seeded, diced tomatoes with salt and pepper and just enough olive oil to barely moisten. Spread the crostini with fresh goat cheese and top with a generous spoonful of the diced tomatoes. Garnish with a sprig of basil.

9. Tomato salad with pickled shallots and goat cheese croutons: Slice a couple of shallots thin and cover them in a bowl with red wine vinegar to pickle for a half-hour or so. Cut tomatoes (a mix of colors and shapes is best) in thick slices and season them with salt, pepper, olive oil and the strained vinegar from the shallots. Spread crostini (No. 8) with fresh goat cheese. Arrange the salad in a low mound on a platter with the goat cheese crostini around the outside. Scatter the pickled shallots over top.

10. Tomato summer pudding: This is adapted from Judy Rodgers’ “The Zuni Cafe Cookbook.” Make a highly seasoned tomato salad (see No. 9). Oil a soufflé dish and arrange a solid layer of crostini (No. 8) in the bottom. Spoon some tomato salad over that. Arrange another layer of crostini and spoon in more tomatoes. Repeat until all of the tomatoes are used, finishing with a layer of tomatoes. Lay a sheet of parchment or waxed paper on top and place a plate just big enough to fit inside the soufflé dish. Weight the plate to compress the ingredients (a can of tomatoes works well!), and set aside until the crostini are well soaked with tomato juice, one to two hours.

11. Tomato confit I: Cut plum or cherry tomatoes in half lengthwise and squeeze out the seeds. Arrange them in a single layer in a baking dish (as many as you can, as they will shrink during cooking). Scatter peeled garlic cloves among the tomatoes and add enough olive oil to come halfway up the side. Bake at 400 degrees for a couple of hours until the tomatoes shrivel and are well-caramelized. These will store in the refrigerator for weeks — terrific for adding to pasta sauces, garnishing grilled or roasted meat or fish or topping crostini.

12. Tomato confit II: This version isn’t quite as unctuous but has a more intense tomato flavor. Cut sauce or cherry tomatoes in half lengthwise and squeeze out the seeds. Arrange in a single layer on a jellyroll pan and season generously with salt, pepper and minced garlic. Drizzle over olive oil and roast at 300 degrees for a couple of hours until the tomatoes begin to caramelize.

13. Sautéed cherry tomatoes: In a large skillet, heat olive oil and a peeled clove of garlic over medium-high heat. When the garlic begins to color, add cherry tomatoes and sprinkle with thyme. Cook, shaking the pan, until the tomatoes split and blister. Season to taste with salt and a little red wine vinegar.

14.  Spaghetti with tuna and spicy tomatoes: Sauté chopped garlic, fennel seeds and dried red chile flakes in olive oil until fragrant. Add chopped tomatoes and chopped anchovy fillets and cook for a minute before adding best-quality canned tuna, along with the olive oil it’s packed in. Cook until the tomatoes and tuna break down into a chunky sauce. Season with red wine vinegar and serve over spaghetti.

15. Individual lasagna with slow-roasted tomatoes and pesto: Prepare tomato confit II (No. 12). Smear squares of cooked fresh pasta with a bit of pesto and place them on serving plates. Top with a generous spoonful of ricotta and spoon over some tomato confit. Top with another square of cooked pasta and more tomatoes. Return to the oven to heat through; serve immediately.

16. Stuffed tomatoes with garlicky bread crumbs
: Slice the top one-third off large tomatoes and squeeze out the seeds. Place them in a baking dish so they fit tightly and season with salt. Grind cubes of stale bread with minced garlic and minced parsley and spoon the seasoned bread crumbs over top. Drizzle with olive oil and roast at 400 degrees until the bread crumbs are nicely browned.

17. Bacon and cherry tomato skewers: Cut bacon strips in thirds lengthwise. Wrap each bacon piece around a cherry tomato and thread them onto skewers. Grill over a medium fire until browned and crisp, about 10 minutes.

18. Braised whole fish with tomatoes, thyme and olives: Warm some olive oil, onion and garlic in a saucepan until fragrant. Add water, white wine, several sprigs of thyme, dried red chile flakes and salt and simmer. Arrange sliced tomatoes in a baking dish just large enough to hold a whole fish (such as Tai snapper). Scatter chopped pitted olives and minced parsley. Lay the fish on top. Bring the liquid to a rolling boil and pour it over the fish. Seal tightly with foil and bake at 350 degrees until the fish lifts easily from the bone. Remove from the oven and let stand briefly before serving.

19. Bread salad with tomatoes, cucumbers and arugula: Cut about one-half loaf of stale country-style bread into large chunks and soak in water to cover. Seed and chop tomatoes and put them in a bowl with sliced cucumbers, salt, pepper, olive oil and red wine vinegar. Set aside to draw the juice from the tomatoes. Squeeze the bread cubes dry and add them to the tomato mixture with some diced red onion. Scatter several good handfuls of arugula over top and stir to combine.

20. Tomato risotto with burrata: Make a plain risotto and when it’s done stir in peeled, seeded, chopped tomatoes off the heat. Chop one-quarter of a burrata ball and stir it in briskly until the cheese melts and gets stringy. Stir in slivered basil and serve while hot.

21. Tomato and grilled corn salad: Grill a couple ears of corn. Shuck them and cut away the kernels into a mixing bowl. Add halved cherry tomatoes or diced tomatoes and season with diced red onion, a little minced garlic, lemon juice and olive oil. Add a couple handfuls of arugula and toss well to combine. Arrange on a platter; use a vegetable peeler to shave Parmigiano-Reggiano over top.

22. Stuffed tomatoes II: Make the marinara sauce from No. 3, adding capers and a splash of white wine. Make the breadcrumbs from No. 16 and add four chopped anchovies and about one-third cup toasted pine nuts. Slice the top one-third off large tomatoes and squeeze out the seeds. Spoon the sauce into a roasting pan and arrange the tomatoes on top, so they fit tightly. Stuff the tomatoes lightly with the breadcrumbs; don’t pack it tightly or the stuffing will get pasty. Drizzle with olive oil and bake at 400 degrees until the tops are browned and crusty and the tomatoes are melting in texture. Serve hot or at room temperature.

23. Grilled sardines with confit tomatoes: Prepare tomato confit I (No. 11). Flavor olive oil with salt, minced garlic, dried oregano and red chile flakes. Season sliced cucumbers with salt and lemon juice. Arrange the cucumbers in a low mound on a platter. Dip cleaned sardines in the oil mixture and grill on the skin side until done, three minutes. Place them on top of the cucumbers and spoon over some of the confit tomatoes, including a little of the flavored oil.

24. Tomato salad with burrata: Make a tart tomato salad by seasoning chopped tomatoes with a little garlic, salt, black pepper, olive oil and a good splash of red wine vinegar. Cut a ball of burrata in quarters and place it in the middle of a plate, opened out like a flower. Spoon the salad around it and serve with crostini. This is also good made with halved cherry tomatoes that have been seasoned this way and then roasted in a hot oven just until they blister.

25. Peperonata: Sauté peeled, seeded, chopped tomatoes with onion and olive oil. Add roasted, peeled bell peppers cut into strips. Stir in a splash of red wine and simmer until the mixture cooks into a marmalade. At the very end, stir in a sauce made by grinding a jalapeno, garlic, basil, parsley and olive oil to a thin paste. Serve hot or at room temperature.

26. Ratatouille: Sauté onions in olive oil until they’re tender and transfer them to a big pot. Sauté zucchini until tender and add that to the pot. Sauté eggplant until tender and add that to the pot. Add peeled, seeded, diced tomatoes and red wine vinegar and cook until they thicken. Add them to the pot; heat everything through to combine flavors. Garnish with torn basil leaves and serve hot or at room temperature.

27. Scrambled eggs with tomatoes and basil: Adapted from Richard Olney’s “Simple French Food.” Cook peeled, seeded and chopped tomatoes with a little olive oil and several peeled whole garlic cloves over low heat until the tomatoes are dry. Discard the garlic and add raw eggs beaten with butter and scramble until set but still moist. When the eggs begin to thicken, add a good handful of basil leaves.

28. Tomatoes stuffed with tuna: Make a tuna salad with best-quality canned tuna, blanched green beans, mayonnaise, capers and a generous squeeze of lemon juice. Slice the tops off the tomatoes, scoop out the pulp and fill with the salad. This is particularly good when made with smoked tuna.

29. Roasted cherry tomatoes stuffed with mozzarella and anchovies: Cut cherry tomatoes in half and scoop out the pulp. Place a small piece of anchovy in the cavity and top it with enough finely diced mozzarella to fill. Broil until the mozzarella melts and bubbles, about five minutes. Top with a small piece of fresh basil and serve immediately.

30 Tomato and bread soup: Adapted from Alice Waters’ “Chez Panisse Vegetables.” Cook minced onions and garlic in a lot of olive oil until soft. Spoon out about one-third of the onion mixture and add peeled, seeded, chopped tomatoes. Cook until the tomatoes are very tender and pass through a food mill. Return the tomatoes to the pan with the reserved onions and over very low heat, stir in enough fresh bread crumbs to thicken the soup. Stir in some basil and more olive oil. Serve hot or at room temperature.

September 21, 2009

21 Sep

Walking the farm is one of the most relaxing and enjoyable parts of my day. I love to see how orchards are developing and what new crops are being planted. Over the last few months I have been watching the pomegranate hedges with great anticipation. There pomegranates planted all over Fairview. On the farm trees have multiple purposes; most for food and shade, some separate the farm from the road, others are used to hide structures, and others are for beautification. The pomegranates started as small green lanterns and grew in to brilliant red ornaments all over the farm. A few have cracked in their ripeness and birds have enjoyed the nourishment of the seeds. This week we will get to enjoy them as fall’s pomegranate harvest begins. High in vitamin C, potassium, and antioxidants and packed with stain power. If you remove the seeds in water and then strain them, you will prevent your hands from turning purplish-pink.

Hope you get a change to walk to the farm this week.

Jen Corey

Marketing Manager

Pre-used Paper Needed: Every day we print reports, documents, and newsletters on blank paper. Although we recycle, I feel it is not enough. We could be using “pre-used” or “scratch paper.” I am asking CSA members, to collect paper at home and work that has only been printed on one side and donate it to the farm. We take white or colored paper. Bring it by the paper bags or box loads. Drop off any time at CSA pick-up or the farm stand and it will make its way up to the office. Thank you in advance.

Volunteers Needed: We are looking for someone to work with the Executive Director on our donor data base. Experience with Filemaker Pro is necessary and 3 hours/wk commitment is appreciated. Please contact Jenny Milan, Executive Director of Fairview Gardens at jenny@fairviewgardens.org.

Upcoming Events:

What: Hope Dance films presents THE END OF THE LINE; Imagine a world without Fish

When: TOMORROW, Tuesday, September 22, 2009 7pm

Where: Santa Barbara Public Library, Faulkner Gallery

Suggested donation: $7

Description: More than just a doomsday warning, THE END OF THE LINE offers real, practical solutions that are simple and doable, including advocating for controlled fishing of engendered species, protecting networks of marine reserves off-limits to fishing, and educating consumers that they have a choice by purchasing fish from sustainable fisheries.

What: Carbon Economy Series Santa Barbara presents Soil Food Web and Compost Technologies with Dr. Elaine Ingham

When: October 30-November 1, 2009

Where: Training at Orella Ranch, Gaviota Coast, north of Santa Barbara

Description: Restoring the Soil Food Web is essential to rebuilding soil health and productivity…In this course, you’ll look at the elements of a healthy soil food web, learn how to analyze and improve your own soil, and learn how to make composts and extracts to strengthen the Soil Food Web.  The Soil Food Web course provides knowledge and research findings for those at the grass roots level of working with soils.

For more information about registration go to:  www.CarbonEconomySB.com

Reflections from a Fairview Apprentice: Fancy Fechser-Deleon

I came to Fairview as a romantic and a willing student.  Prior to working at Fairview, my experience was with small-scale educational gardens.  Shortly after the apprenticeship began, I quickly realized that my prior idea of farm life was a bit unrealistic.  Farming is not for the faint hearted.

I recall the first few weeks – cuts on my hands, calluses, sun burns, and subtle aches and pains throughout my body…did I mention that we start at 6:30 am?  I remember trying to bunch carrots, radishes, and chard.  I dare not mention how slow my bunching skills were.  The very skilled workers beside me were lapping me.  Luckily this wasn’t a job interview, for had it been, I would not have started my first day as a real farmer.

One may ask, “Why continue?” Well, eventually the initial side-affects of farming wear off and you begin to find yourself in a routine.  You pick up the vital techniques that your skilled mentors have acquired throughout the years such as, always stay covered.  Face the sun in the early morning and turn your back to the sun after mid-day. The knack of planting seedlings with one hand and how to minimize the times you bend over or squat when harvesting vegetables.

At Fairview, you learn to look at seasons and cycles in a different way.  I would go home for a weekend and return on Tuesday awestruck by the amount of growth that took place in just a couple days.  Javier, one of the long time resident-farmers at Fairview, would teach us to look at farming as though it were poetry.  When he’d notice us getting a little fatigued he would stop and remind us of our surroundings and to just take it all in – the sounds, the smells, the colors. 

The apprenticeship at Fairview Gardens has shown me how truly rewarding it is to take part in cultivating the land.  I credit my time at Fairview for revealing the deeper connections between the food I eat and farming.  For the first time in my personal daily food system, I am the producer and the consumer.  For the first time in my life I truly know how much work it takes to get food to the restaurants and markets that we enjoy every day and I deeply appreciate my meals more. 

Sneak Peek:

Small Share

Pomegranate

Summer Squash

Green Beans

Arugula

Corn

Carrots           

Cherry tomatoes

Tomatoes 

Large Share

Pomegranate

Summer Squash

Green Beans

Arugula

Corn

Carrots           

Cherry Tomatoes

Tomatoes

Recipes:

Arugula Salad with Pomegranate, Corn and Cherry Tomatoes

You will love the combination of the spicy arugula with the tart juicy pomegranate and sweet corn and tomatoes. All from your CSA share. This salad is from Head Farmer Toby, enjoy!

Toss your arugula with pomegranates seeds, corn cut off the cob, and halve the cherry tomatoes. Add avocado and crushed walnuts if you have it. Dress it with white wine vinegar, olive oil, sea salt, and freshly ground pepper.

Smoky Corn Salsa (Bon Appétit | August 2009 by The Bon Appétit Test Kitchen)

Make a batch of this versatile sauce, then serve it all week. You can spoon it over grilled fish, chicken, or pork—or use it to fill quesadillas. Makes 4 cups

Ingredients

2 red bell peppers, quartered, seeded
3 ears of fresh corn, husked
1 bunch green onions, trimmed
4 tablespoons (about) olive oil, divided
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 teaspoon ground cumin
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
1 tablespoon bottled chipotle hot sauce
2/3 cup chopped fresh cilantro

Preparation

Prepare barbecue (high heat). Brush bell peppers, corn, and green onions with some olive oil. Grill vegetables until well charred in spots, turning occasionally with tongs and removing pieces as they brown, 5 minutes for green onions, 10 to 15 minutes for bell peppers and corn. Cool slightly. Cut bell peppers and green onions into 1/3-inch pieces. Cut corn off cob.

Heat 2 tablespoons oil in heavy small skillet over medium-high heat. Add garlic and cumin; sauté until garlic begins to sizzle but does not brown, about 30 seconds. Pour into large bowl; mix in lime juice and hot sauce. Mix in vegetables. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Cool completely; mix in cilantro. 

Cold Soba Noodle Salad

This was a free form recipe I came up with and I think it turned out, so I wanted to share it with you. The dressing is packed with intense flavors, so only a limited amount of oil is necessary.

Ingredients

1/4 cup fresh citrus juice, lime, orange, or grapefruit (mix and match or choose one)
3 tablespoons canola oil
1 tablespoon sesame oil (it’s potent, so you won’t need much)
a splash of soy sauce
2 tablespoons brown sugar
a few cloves of finely chopped garlic

a little bit of grated ginger
1 big handful of green beans, trimmed, cut diagonally and parboiled (they are tender and best if still crunchy)
2 big handfuls of shredded peeled carrots

Corn cut off of 1 large cob (don’t let the worm slip in!)
1 small handful sliced green onions

1 jalapeno finely chopped or a good size pinch of dried red pepper flakes (omit if you don’t like spice)
1 package soba noodles (Japanese buckwheat noodles) follow package instructions and be sure to not over cook)
salt and pepper to taste (won’t need much because the sauce is very well seasoned)

 Mix dressing and veggies, leaving noodles to the side. Chill for a few hours and then toss before serving. Lots of room to improvise, so try adding celery, napa cabbage, or peas. If you do not like soba noodles, try with whole wheat linguini.

September 14, 2009

14 Sep

It’s Monday and after a wonderfully restful weekend in Santa Cruz, I am back on the farm, with gratitude and energy for this week’s tasks. I had the opportunity in Santa Cruz to visit another organic farm and CSA program. The farm at UC Santa Cruz is similar to Fairview Gardens; it is an education center, a food source for their community, and a home to those who work on the land. When you travel I encourage you to visit other farms and bring back with you encouragement and inspiration. We would love to hear about your experiences. Check out www.localharvest.org.

I hope you enjoy this week’s harvest and recipes,

Jen Corey

Marketing Manager

Volunteer Needed: We are looking for someone to work with the Executive Director on our donor data base. Experience with Filemaker Pro is necessary and 3 hours/wk commitment is appreciated. Please contact Jenny Milan, Executive Director of Fairview Gardens at jenny@fairviewgardens.org.

Upcoming Events:

What: City Repair Project, A Street Corner Revolution; Slide Show & Talk with Mark Lakeman

When: Wednesday, September 16, 2009, 7:00 PM

Where: Santa Barbara Public Library, Faulkner Gallery

Suggested Donation: $10

Description: Multidisciplinary, City Repair combines architecture, urban planning, anthropology, community development, public art, permaculture and ecological design in projects that transform public space.

Contact: Lynn Seigel-Boettner, SB Food Not Lawns and Santa Barbara Permaculture Network (805) 966 6522; Lynn@sbfoodnotlawns.org

What: Hope Dance films presents THE END OF THE LINE; Imagine a world without Fish

When: Tuesday, September 22, 2009 7pm

Where: Santa Barbara Public Library, Faulkner Gallery

Suggested donation: $7

Description: More than just a doomsday warning, THE END OF THE LINE offers real, practical solutions that are simple and doable, including advocating for controlled fishing of engendered species, protecting networks of marine reserves off-limits to fishing, and educating consumers that they have a choice by purchasing fish from sustainable fisheries.

Reflections from a Fairview Apprentice:

My name is Lauren and I have been an apprentice at Fairview Gardens. I applied for the program with no experience in farming but with a driving interest to participate. I have lived and worked in metropolitan areas all my life where nature took a back seat to convenience. My goal in joining this apprenticeship program was to learn about the farming industry, meet new people with different perspectives and increase my knowledge of growing healthy and nourishing food.

Prior to the apprenticeship, I worked in theatrical production where I spent most of my time as a Stage Manager. This gave me a great understanding of meeting deadlines within a very specific time frame. I found a link between theater opening nights, CSA and Markets. Each event put on for the public’s well being, where the expectation is a desire for quality production and beneficial nourishment. Bringing this type of quality to our community is the link between the world of performing arts and local organic food that I most enjoy.

My experience at Fairview has been a valuable one. The people I have had a chance to interact with are full of energy, excitement and vitality. They have taught me so much in my time here and I will be forever thankful. I have truly recognized the abundance of what this planet can provide us with and how rich a relationship this can be when we take good care of the land, ourselves and our food.  I have been very lucky to have this experience and I will continue to share this knowledge with others.

I want to express gratitude to Toby (the farm manager), my fellow apprentices and all the people who work at Fairview an uplifting and enlightening experience. And, I want to personally thank you, our CSA members for purchasing our food and appreciating our hard work. Without you we wouldn’t be Fairview Gardens.

Sneak Peek:

Small Share

Lettuce

Green Beans

Strawberries

Tomatoes

Cherry tomatoes

Peppers

Garlic

Summer Squash

Large Share

Lettuce

Green Beans

Strawberries

Tomatoes

Cherry Tomatoes

Peppers

Garlic

Summer Squash

Collards

Radish

Recipes: the following recipes are from Fields of Greens: New Vegetarian Recipes from the Celebrated Greens Restaurant by Annie Somerville

Ratatouille (My suggestion is to watch Disney’s Ratatouille after dinner. I loved it!)

Make this stew at the height of summer, when eggplant, peppers, and tomatoes couldn’t be better. As the vegetables slowly simmer together, their sweet juices soak up the flavor of the fragrant fresh herbs. You can use Greek oregano in place of marjoram, but taste it first—its strong, pungent flavor can overpower the delicate basil. Serve over creamy soft polenta sprinkled with grated Parmesan. It’s even better the next day, serve at room temperature with crusty sourdough bread and salty black olives.

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

1 medium-sized red onion, cut into quarters and thickly sliced

Salt and pepper

6 garlic cloves, finely chopped

3 medium-size Japanese eggplants, cut in half lengthwise, then sliced ¾ inch thick on a diagonal, about 3 cups

2 medium-sized bell peppers, cut into thick stripes and then triangles, about 2 cups

1 pound summer squash, cut into thick slices or wedges

2 pounds vine-ripened tomatoes, peeled, seeded, and chopped, about 3 cups

1 bay leaf

3 tablespoons chopped fresh basil

½ tablespoon chopped fresh marjoram or Greek oregano

Heat the olive oil in a large skillet and add the onion, ½ teaspoon salt, and a few pinches of pepper. Sauté over medium heat until soft, about 5 minutes.

Add the garlic, eggplant, peppers, ¼ teaspoon salt, and a few pinches of pepper; sauté for 8 to 10 minutes, until the eggplant and peppers are just tender.

Add the summer squash, tomatoes, bay leaf, ½ teaspoon salt, and a few pinches of pepper. Stew over low heat for about 20 minutes, until everything is tender.

Add the basil and marjoram just before serving. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Serves four.

Tomato-Basil Tart with Smoked Mozzarella Cheese

We make this summer tart at the height of the season with fully ripe tomatoes and fragrant basil. The tastes couldn’t be better—the smoky cheese and the tasty black olives perfectly balance the sweetness of the tomatoes. It’s important to remove the juice and seeds from the tomatoes; the juice will thin the custard. Delicious served warm or at room temperature, this tart is just the right dish for a picnic or a light evening meal.

1 recipe Tart Dough (Jen’s suggestion à you can use frozen puff pastry if you do not know how or have the time to make your own dough)

¾ pound fresh tomatoes, seeded, drained, and cut into ½ inch pieces, about 1½ cups

3 garlic cloves, finely chopped

1 loosely packed cup of fresh basil leaves, coarsely chopped

8 to 10 Gaeta or Niçoise black olives, pitted and coarsely chopped

Salt and pepper

3 large eggs

1 cup half and half or ½ cup half and half plus ½ cup crème frâiche

1 ounce smoked mozzarella cheese, grated, about ½ cup

1 ounce Parmesan cheese, grated, about 1/3 cup

Prepare the tart shell and follow the directions for prebaking it.

Toss the tomatoes with the garlic, basil, olives, 1/8 teaspoon salt, and a large pinch of pepper. Set them aside to marinate for 15 minutes, then drain off their juice.

Preheat the oven to 375ºF. Beat eggs in a bowl and add the half and half, a generous ¼ teaspoon salt, and a pinch of pepper.

Combine the mozzarella and Parmesan cheeses and sprinkle them on the bottom of the tart dough. Spread the tomatoes on the cheese, then pour the custard over. Bake for 35 to 40 minutes until the custard is set and the top is golden.

Makes one 9-inch tart; serves six.

Sautéed Summer Beans and Cherry Tomatoes        

The keys to this simple summer sauté are the freshness of the beans and the sweetness of the cherry tomatoes. Use any variety of beans you like, just as long as they’re tender. For wonderful color and texture, combine two or three varieties with red and yellow cherry tomatoes. Toss with fresh marjoram, basil, or tarragon to highlight the delicious flavors.

Salt and Pepper

1 pound green beans, yellow wax beans, Romano beans, or any combination of fresh beans, about 4 cups

1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil

1 shallot, diced

1 garlic clove, finely chopped

1 to1 ½ teaspoons fresh lemon juice

2 tablespoons dry white wine

½ pint cherry tomatoes, halved, 1 cup

1 tablespoon chopped fresh tarragon, marjoram, or basil

Bring a large pot of water to boil and add ½ teaspoon salt. Trim the stems from the beans, leaving the tail ends on. Cut them in half on a diagonal of leave whole if small. Drop the beans into the water and cook until tender, 4 to 5 minutes, depending on their size. (If you’re using different varieties of beans, cook them separately, because their cooking time will vary.) Rinse under cold water and set aside to drain.

Heat the olive oil in a medium-size sauté pan; add the shallots, garlic, 1 teaspoon of the lemon juice, and the white wine; cook over medium heat for 1 minute, until the pan is nearly dry. Add the beans, ¼ teaspoon salt, and a few pinches of pepper; sauté for 2 to 3 minutes. Add the cherry tomatoes and herbs; sauté for 1 to 2 minutes, just long enough so that the tomatoes heat through without losing their shape. Season with salt, pepper, and lemon juice to taste. Serve immediately.

Serves four.

September 8, 2009

8 Sep

Last night I felt the break in the heat and I am so thankful for cool breeze that wafts through the farm. We all took short days yesterday, and I headed to the beach. I am learning how to surf. Who knew that a Santa Barbara local would take so long to finally get out on a board? We ate fresh farm veggies and watermelon, and a few non-farm beverages and snacks J. It was a perfect day. I hope you enjoyed the sunshine, a Labor Day BBQ, and good conversation with friends and family. This week we have a wonderful harvest share.

I am including two limericks from a former CSA member and another narrative from one of our apprentices and hope you will enjoy their perspective of life on the farm.

Rested and ready for fall produce,

Jen Corey

Marketing Manager

Two Limericks in Tribute to Fairview Gardens

Fairview Garden’s a mighty fine place

To serve as our produce-buying base

            You sell veggies galore

            (of some fruits we’d like more)

Fragrant blossoms to put in a vase

For organic you make a great case

Some leaves look like fine patterns of lace

            Varied products don’t bore

            They’re all fresh from the core

And you serve us with plenty of grace

With gratitude for 17 years of delicious and healthful eating

Farewell from Tonia Jauch

Goleta, CA –August, 2009

A message from a Fairview Apprentice: My Story

Hello everyone my name is Connor Lynch and I am an apprentice here at Fairview Gardens. You may have seen my around in the fields or occasionally helping out at the CSA pickup. I have been working here at Fairview for almost five months now and so far have learned a ton. It seems like every time I am on the farm I learn something new from one of the farmers, the apprentices, and the staff or just from opening my eyes and seeing something a new way. To be honest I thought I could become a world class farmer in just five months but I am realizing more and more that the learning is never truly complete. I guess that is what drew me to farming in the first place though.

Besides just planting sunflowers and Kmart bought strawberry plants in my backyard my first real experience in gardening was at my boarding school in Montana. I had been at the school for about six months when I was placed in the gardening program. I quickly became in enthralled with the greenhouse and as spring began the ever changing garden outside. The thing that probably fascinated me the most was soils and how complex it was. It became my personal mission to try and make the best compost for the soil in the garden. My teacher, Cara, was amazing and that little plot of land became a very calming and safe place for me at the school.

When I came home to visit from school I was required to do some community service so I chose Fairview because I wanted to learn more about how a real garden operated. It was there that I met Toby McPartland the farm manager who encouraged me to applying for the apprenticeship. After going back and forth on email it was decided that it was a good idea for me to join Fairview for the season. And I guess the rest is history. I would like to say that I have settled into the steady rhythms of farm life, but to be honest things still surprise me everyday. As I said before, I have gotten honest with my self and realize that I have along way to go. However, I can’t begin to describe how much I have learned and how I have been changed by what I have seen and done.

I will be leaving the farm a bit earlier than the rest of the apprentices due to the fact that I have to start my junior year of high school at Laguna Blanca so I will be missing the farm. I already have a hard time going away on trips because I miss the delicious food so much. This coming year I hope to continue learning and more about agriculture and the environment as a whole as well as working on some of my other passions such as art and running. I hope you have enjoyed learning a bit about me and I look forward to seeing you all around the farm at some point. Enjoy your delicious food!!

Sincerely,

Connor Lynch 

Sneak (not so sneaky for Tuesday pick up members) Peek:

Small Share  

Cherry tomatoes

Peppers

Lettuce

Lima Beans (shell and boil 20 minutes)

Tomatoes

Arugula/Radish

French Beans

Spaghetti Squash (see below for recipe)

Large Share

Cherry Tomatoes

Peppers

Lettuce 

Lima Beans (shell and boil 20 minutes)

Tomatoes

Arugula/Radish

French Beans

Spaghetti Squash (see below for recipe)

Kale/Collards

Sumemr Squash

Garlic

Mint    

Recipes:

French Red Pepper Soup (from CSA member and my mom Jane Higa)

Here is the recipe for the wonderful red bell pepper soup.  It was the contribution of Mary Blackwood Collier in the cookbook called:  The Art of Dining:  Santa Barbara Artists and Their Food.  According to Mary, “This wonderful soup is the very first ‘recette’ I learned in Paule McPherson’s French Bistro Cooking Class.  I have made it regularly ever since, to serve hot in winter and cold in summer, for everything from dinner parties to school lunches.” This recipe “serves 8 handsomely.”

2 T butter

2 large onions, chopped

2 carrots, peeled and sliced

6 cups chicken stock

6 red bell peppers, seeded and chopped

1 tsp dried oregano or 1 T fresh oregano

Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

Cayenne pepper to taste (optional)

1/2 cup cream or half and half (optional)

Melt the butter and add the onions, carrots and oregano.  Cover and cook for 10 to 15 minutes.  Add the chicken stock, peppers, salt and pepper.  Cook uncovered for about 2 minutes at a medium high heat.  Puree the soup in a blender or food processor.  Although it may be served as is, it is much more elegant when pressed through a sieve, skin and pulp discarded, rendering a beautifully smooth soup.  Taste for seasoning.  The soup is perfectly delicious without the cream but certainly a bit more finished with it.  If you add the cream and are serving the soup cold, do so just before serving.  When serving it hot with the cream, bring the soup to a boil, reduce heat, and add ROOM TEMPERATURE cream slowly. 

Before serving, garnish with your choice of:  a dollop of sour cream or a tsp of the cream you did not put into the soup, a slice of avocado, a spring of fresh oregano, chives, parsley or anything else you think would look pretty.  You can also garnish with shrimp that has been marinated in grated ginger for no longer than 30 minutes and then quickly stir fried in a little oil.

Note from the mom who is always a bit rushed (and perhaps not as elegant)….whenever I have made this soup I have not taken the time to strain it and have found that I like the more rustic texture….and have always received rave reviews!  I also tend not to add the half and half or cream.

Italian Stuffed Spaghetti Squash (from Nikki and David Goldbeck’s American Wholefoods Cuisine)

Spaghetti squash is fairly new on the market and worth getting to know. The cooked squash breaks up into thin strands, making it much like spaghetti in both shape and use.

2 small to medium spaghetti squash (about 2 to 2 ½ pounds each)

2 cups ricotta cheese

1 cup shredded mozzarella cheese

¼ cup grated parmesan cheese

½ teaspoon oregano

Pepper

2 cups tomato sauce

A few thin slices of mozzarella or provolone cheese

Cut squash in half lengthwise and steam for 15 minutes until barely tender. Scoop out seeds. Using the prongs of a fork, gently loosen squash pulp from skin. Pour off any liquid that accumulates and pat surface dry.

Preheat oven to 350º to 375ºF.

Combine ricotta with shredded mozzarella, Parmesan, and seasonings.

Fill cavity of squash with cheese mixture. Top with a little of the tomato sauce and some cheese slices. Bake for 15 minutes until cheese is hot and gooey. Serve with remaining sauce. As you eat, pull squash strands loose with a fork and mix with cheesy topping.

Serves 4.

Click on these links for a few good Indian Lima Bean recipes:

http://enjoyindianfood.blogspot.com/2009/01/lima-beans-usal-2.html

http://enjoyindianfood.blogspot.com/2008/03/tittori-parsi-lima-beans.html