Archive | October, 2009

October 26, 2009

26 Oct

Dear CSA members,

Last weekend I went to the Disney Concert Hall to hear the Los Angeles Philharmonic. Our seats were sold to us at the bargain price of $17, but when we arrived, we knew we were in for an incredible show. We were three rows back behind the orchestra, and could see every facial expression and movement of the conductor. The passion of the musicians and the rhythm of the music were breathtaking even to my untrained ears. I particularly noticed the importance of the shifts in pace, volume, and instruments. (Can you tell by my vocabulary that I am not a musician?) As I sat there I thought about our farm. I thought about the shifts and the changes with the seasons; how summer time requires an enormous amount of work for the harvesters because everything ripens all at the same time and how fall brings new crops and a new pace for the farm.

With four weeks left Fall CSA season and the 2009 CSA year, we are enjoying the delicateness of this time. After the rains we must be light on the ground and careful to not compact it when it is so vulnerable. It is these fluctuations in season that make life on the farm beautiful, just as the music I heard this weekend was beautiful because of its changes.

A new item in this weeks CSA share is mulva, also known as mallow. It is part of our edible local landscape. I bet you have seen it in your yard and thought it was simply a “weed.” Well, I assure you that it is not, JUST a weed. I recommend sautéed mulva drizzled with olive oil and lemon, adding it to soups and stir fry’s, or using them to wrap dolmas. I have also included a Turkish recipe cooking it over rice.

Please enjoy your adventures in cooking,

Jen Corey

Marketing Manager

Volunteers Needed: We are looking for volunteers with carpentry skills to work on a small job here at the farm. It can be completed in an estimated two Saturdays. We don’t have a date set yet, but hope to soon. Please email your name, phone number(s), and skills to our Board President, Adrianne Davis at adrianne_a@cox.net. Thank you in advance for your support and help.

Pre-used Paper Needed: Every day we print reports, documents, and newsletters on blank paper. Although we recycle, I feel it is not enough. We could be using “pre-used” or “scratch paper.” I am asking CSA members, to collect paper at home and work that has only been printed on one side and donate it to the farm. We take white or colored paper. Bring it by the paper bags or box loads. Drop off any time at CSA pick-up or the farm stand and it will make its way up to the office.

Sneak Peek:

Small Share

Lettuce

Arugula

Kale

Green Beans   

Flageolet Beans

Squash Yellow

Acorn Squash

Thyme

Mulva (also known as mallow)

Large Share

Lettuce

Arugula

Kale

Green Beans

Flageolet Beans

Squash Yellow

Acorn Squash

Peppers

Thyme

Mulva (also known as mallow)

Recipes: 

Mallow w/ rice & carrots

(from http://veggieway.blogspot.com/2006_02_01_archive.html)
Ingredients:
(serves 2-3)
a bunch of mallow
1 onion, peeled and diced
1-2 carrots, peeled and chopped
1/4 cup of rice, washed and drained
1/2 cup of water
2 tablespoon tomato paste
2 tablespoon olive oil
salt and pepper to taste
1. Transfer the mallows in a bowl full of water; add some vinegar so that you can easily clean the muds. Pick out the yellow leaves if there are any. Leave them for about 10 minutes, then wash, drain and chop the leaves.

2. Sauté the onion in olive oil for a few minutes.

3. Add the carrots and sauté them for about 10 minutes. Then add the paste and stir the mixture.
4. Add the chopped mallows, rice, salt, pepper and water.
5. Cover and cook on low heat until the rice is tender enough.
Enjoy!

Roast Pumpkin with Cheese “Fondue” (Last week’s pumpkins were sugar pie baking pumpkins. I forgot to give you this recipe. From CSA member, chef and my mom, Jane Higa Gourmet magazine, November 2008)

As the pumpkin roasts, its skin becomes gorgeously burnished, while inside, slices of baguette, Gruyere, and Emmental coalesce into a rich, velvety concoction that is utterly fabulous served with a scoop of tender pumpkin flesh.

1 (15 inch) piece of baguette, cut into 1/2 inches slices

1 (7-lb) orange baking pumpkin

1 1/2 cups heavy cream

1 cup reduced-sodium chicken or vegetable broth

1/2 tsp grated nutmeg

2 1/2 cups coarsely grated Gruyere (6 oz)

2 1/2 cups coarsely grated Emmental (6 oz)

1 T olive oil

Preheat oven to 450F with rack in lower third.  Toast baguette slices in 1 layer on a baking sheet in oven until tops are crisp (bread will still be pale), about 7 minutes.  Transfer to a rack to cool.

Remove top of pumpkin by cutting a circle (3 inches in diameter) around stem with a small sharp knife.  Scrape out seeds and any loose fibers from inside pumpkin with a spoon (including top of pumpkin; reserve seeds for another use if desired).  Season inside of pumpkin with 1/2 tsp salt.

Whisk together cream, broth, nutmeg, 1 tsp salt, and 1/2 tsp pepper in a bowl.  Mix together cheeses in another bowl.

Put layer of toasted bread in bottom of pumpkin, then cover with about 1 cup cheese and about 1/2 cup cream mixture.  Continuing layering bread, cheese, and cream mixture until pumpkin is filled to about 1/2 inch from top, using all the cream mixture.  (You may have some bread and cheese left over.)

Cover pumpkin with top and put in an oiled small roasting pan. Brush outside of pumpkin all over with olive oil.  Bake until pumpkin is tender and filling is puffed, 1 1/4 to 1 1/2 hours. 

Note:  Pumpkin can be filled 2 hours before baking and chilled.

Flageolets En Pissenlits (Beans With Dandelion Greens)

(from http://www.recipezaar.com/Flageolets-En-Pissenlits-Beans-With-Dandelion-Greens-139844)

This comes from Michael Robert’s “Parisian Homecooking” and is a typical flageolot dish–and typically served with lamb. Any bitter green–chard, sorrel, collard–can be substituted for the dandelion greens. SERVES 5 -6

Ingredients

1 lb dried flageolet beans (since your beans are fresh, you do not need to soak beans and you can reduce cooking time of beans to 30min)

1 onion, minced

1 carrot, peeled and finely chopped

2 garlic cloves, crushed

1/2 teaspoon dried thyme (or a sprig of fresh thyme)

1/2 teaspoon dried savory (or a sprig of fresh savory)

1 1/2 cups dandelion greens, chopped (try using your kale with this recipe)

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

2 teaspoons salt

fresh ground black pepper

Directions

1. Soak the dried beans in warm water for at least two hours; drain.

2. Place the beans in a flameproof casserole with the onion, carrot, garlic and herbs, and add enough water to cover the beans by one inch.

3. Cover and bring just to the boil over medium heat.

4. Immediately reduce the heat and simmer for about an hour, adding additional water if necessary to keep beans covered.

5. Add the greens and continue to cook for another thirty minutes or until the beans are creamy.

6. Remove from the heat, swirl in the butter and season with the salt and pepper to taste.

7. Serve immediately

October 19, 2009

19 Oct

Dear CSA members,

The rain and mud made for a quiet week on the farm. It was peaceful to sit in the office yurt listening to the pitter patter on my domed ceiling. We have about a month left of CSA before a few months break. Many have asked when the next CSA season will begin again. I wanted to let you know that Toby and I are working on details, possible changes, and updated information about the 2010 CSA and we will let you know as soon as we have things finalized. I can tentatively tell you that we are hoping to start the first week in January and that there will be discounted rates for signing up early and for the full season. Please start about thinking (and saving) if you want to sign up for a full CSA year. As always I appreciate your feedback and would love any input on how this years’ CSA has gone.

With a month left, that also means that we will be collecting the remaining payments for those on payment plans. Marlo, our bookkeeper, is working on getting invoices prepared for you this week. We ask that you remit payment as soon as possible so that we do not have to track you down. If you feel that we have made a mistake, we appreciate your patience and understanding. Marlo can be reached at marlo@fairviewgardens.org with any questions or concerns.

Butternut squash is one of my favorite parts of fall. Please see the recipe for butternut squash soup, but know that you can also add it to pasta with parmesan cheese and sage or simply roast it in chunks as a side dish. The squash is quite hard, so be careful as you cut into them.

Hope this email finds you well and nourished by Fairview produce,

Jen Corey, Marketing Manager

Pre-used Paper Needed: Every day we print reports, documents, and newsletters on blank paper. Although we recycle, I feel it is not enough. We could be using “pre-used” or “scratch paper.” I am asking CSA members, to collect paper at home and work that has only been printed on one side and donate it to the farm. We take white or colored paper. Bring it by the paper bags or box loads. Drop off any time at CSA pick-up or the farm stand and it will make its way up to the office. Thank you in advance.

Sneak Peek:

Green Beans

Lettuce           

Butternut Squash

Mini Pumpkins

Flageolet Beans

Collards

Garlic

Recipes:

Fresh Shell bean & Green Bean Ragout (from CSA member and volunteer Marla Witcher)

1 pound fresh shelled flageolet beans (or tongue of fire)

3/4 pound green beans

2 Tablespoons olive oil

1 onion, diced

2 garlic cloves, peeled and chopped

2 teaspoons chopped savory, marjoram, or parsley

Salt

Fresh-ground pepper

Cook the flageolet in boiling water until creamy and tender.  Start checking after 15 minutes.  When they are done, let the beans cool in their cooking liquid.

Meanwhile, snap off the stem ends, and pull off the tails if dry or tough, from the green beans. Cut into 1 -inch bite-size pieces.  Cook until tender in salted boiling water, drain, and spread out on a baking sheet or plate to cool.  

Heat olive oil in a heavy-bottomed pan over medium heat. Add onion and sauté until translucent; about 10 minutes. Then add garlic, herbs, salt, and pepper. Cook for 4 minutes.  

Drain the shell beans, reserving their cooking liquid.  Stir the shell beans and 3/4 cup of their liquid into the onions.  Raise the heat and bring to a boil.  Turn down the heat and cook for another minute or so to warm the beans through.  Taste for salt and add more as needed.  Serve with a drizzle of extra-virgin olive oil. Serves 4.

Butternut Squash Soup (from farm stand employee Ashley Cornejo)

1 medium butternut squash, cut in half lengthwise and de-seeded)

1 medium white onion, diced

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

1 head garlic, minced

3 cups coconut milk or soy milk

vegetable stock (amount will vary on your desired thickness of soup)

Juice of 1 lemon

Salt, pepper, and cinnamon to taste (usually about a teaspoon of each)

Drizzle butternut squash with olive oil, salt, and pepper and roast at 350 until tender with a fork. Aprox. 30min to 45min. Heat oil in a large pot, and sauté onion and garlic.

Scoop out squash and add to the pot. Add milk, a good splash of stock, lemon, salt, pepper, and cinnamon. Use spoon to mix, and smoosh squash and begin the blending process. Use blender to blend soup in batches. Taste at the end to check flavor.

Easy Cheesy Stuffed Peppers (from CSA member Sherylle Englander… if you still have peppers, try out this recipe)

Cut a rectangular slit lengthwise in your peppers (can use bell, anaheim, jalapeno, or poblano). Take seeds out. Stuff with a mixture of cream cheese and shredded Monterey jack cheese (add cilantro if you like). Press bread crumbs on the top to keep the cheese from oozing. Bake at 350 until the peppers are soft to the pinch. Enjoy!

October 12, 2009

12 Oct

It appears that we will get our first rains of the season this week and the land and farmers look forward to a good soaking. We will still go out and harvest your produce, despite the weather, but it does mean there may be a short break in the fields coming for us. And I must say I am ready for one. It has seemed like a really long year for us, with multiple staff layoffs, what seemed like an endless amount of beans to pick, the coordination of six apprentices (our most ever), another huge building project, including the installation of a sewer pipe and new road, combined with issues facing the farm stand, of which I will comment on in the next few weeks.

The summer weeks fluctuated between really hot and foggy and cool. Some crops did well and others had difficulties handling the changes in weather. The beans, corn, strawberries, tomatoes, summer squash, peppers and all the greens, surprisingly, yielded very well. The cucumbers, basil, eggplant, all the stone fruits (peaches, nectarines, plums, and apricots), avocados and apples were a big disappointment.  To give you an idea of the poor yields this year; in 2008 we harvested 550 boxes of peaches and 150 boxes in 2009.  If we get some colder nights this coming winter, hopefully the fruit set will be better next summer.  

I had hoped to have some more diversity in the shares the last couple of weeks and for the next couple, but nature didn’t quite cooperate with us. We had some problems with ground squirrels and something else (we’re not sure what) that took out beds of beets, turnips, cilantro and spinach, all in one section of our field. Unfortunately it does not seem as though we will include beets in the coming weeks, but the turnips, cilantro and spinach are fast growers and we should have some in about 30 days. In the meantime we can all find some new ways to eat our tomatoes, peppers and squash and appreciate the last few weeks before it gets too cold for them.

We are considering a cooperative CSA for next year, where Fairview would grow the majority of the share or all of it during most weeks, while having the option of purchasing items from other organic farmers in the region when we experience crop losses or when we are short on diversity, such as will always be the case with fruit, considering the limited amount of trees we have of each variety. We are exploring some of the benefits of such collaboration such as increasing the economic security of regional farmers, while providing greater diversity to you.

It appears I made a mistake by not drying out all the popcorn fully.  So if your popcorn turned out as bad as mine did the other night, I apologize and am embarrassed for the mistake.  We will have some more for you in a few weeks, when it is definitely all dry.

Enjoy the weather that is hopefully coming.

Sincerely,

Toby McPartland, Farm Manager

Farm Needs:

Pre-used Paper: Every day we print reports, documents, and newsletters on blank paper. We will reuse paper that has only been printed on one side. We take white or colored paper. Bring it by the paper bags or box loads. Drop off any time at CSA pick-up and it will make its way up to the office. Thank you in advance.

Upcoming Events:

What: Fresh Greens; dance to the new green beat… SBCC Adult Education Class presented by The Sustainability Project; taught by CSA member and architect John Kelly

When: Tuesdays in October 2009, 5:30 – 7:00 pm

Where: The Faulkner Gallery, SB Central Library

Description: How can we thrive in a world of economic uncertainty, peak oil, and climate change? Hear personal stories about simple, affordable, everyday sustainable lifestyles and share your experiences with green living. Visit green homes and gardens.

Discuss how our ongoing crisis is an opportunity to create the next major green movement. For more information about each class see attached flyer or go to

http://www.sbcc.edu/adulted

What: Carbon Economy Series (for more detailed information about the series and registration fees and discounts go to www.CarbonEconomySB.com)

Soil Food Web and Compost Technologies with Dr. Elaine Ingham

When: October 30-November 1, 2009 Training at Orella Ranch, Gaviota, CA
Description: In this course, you’ll look at the elements of a healthy soil food web, learn how to analyze and improve your own soil, and learn how to make composts and extracts to strengthen the soil food web.  The Soil Food Web course provides knowledge and research findings for those at the grass roots level of working with soils. That includes not just farmers who grow crops, but also those who graze cattle, sheep and other livestock, fruit and vegetable growers, greens keepers, parks and gardens workers, nursery operators – in fact anyone who grows things.  The course offers a way of improving the soils we work with now and a way to keep soils in this healthier state without damaging any other eco-system.

Sustainable Land Management with Darren Doherty and Kirk Gadzia

When:  November 10-15, 2009 Two Part Training at Orella Ranch, Gaviota, CA

Description: Sustainable grazing and agricultural land management practices emphasizing soil building, water conservation, and long range planning for productivity and health. Benefits include: Improving soil health and biodiversity of rangelands and pastures. Increasing grazing and wildlife capacity.  Increasing annual profits and enhancing livelihoods. Optimally using rainfall and conserving water.  Growing healthier crops and achieving higher yields. Reversing desertification in brittle environments. Breaking the cycle of food and water insecurity. Enhancing family relationships.

Sneak Peek:

Small Share

Lettuce           

Arugula or Radish

Kale

Cherry Tomatoes

Tomatoes

Peppers

Pumpkins

Garlic  

Large Share

Lettuce

Arugula or Radish       

Kale

Cherry Tomatoes

Tomatoes

Peppers

Pumpkin

Garlic

Recipes (thanks to CSA member and my mom, Jane Higa for contributing):

Glazed Vegetables (from my mom’s SBCC Adult Education cooking class taught by Michele Molony)- radishes become sweet and tender

The Veggies:

Pearl onions

Radishes, leaving a little stem on, cut in half

Carrots (cut into chucks the same size as the onions and radishes)

For 1 lb of veggies:

Season the veggies with salt and pepper, place in a pan in a single layer

Add enough water to come half-way up the veggies

2 tbsp butter

1 tsp sugar

Bring to a simmer, covered it with a sheet of parchment paper cut to fit the pan (I did this, but took it off after 12 minutes because I thought it was taking too long to simmer the liquid off)

Keep at a simmer until most of the liquid has evaporated (start checking at around 15 minutes). Toss the veggies around in the pan to cover them with the glaze, and serve! (If all of the liquid has evaporated, add a tbsp of water to the pan; it will help un-stick the glaze and cover the veggies) A great side dish with risotto, meat, or fish.

Green Chile Cheese Enchiladas (from momma Higa, Los Angeles Times September 23, 2009 issue)
Green Chile sauce:
3 tablespoon oil
1/4 cup diced salt pork (I think bacon would have been fine)
1/2 cup finely diced onion
4 tsp minced garlic
3 tablespoon flour
2 cup chopped green chile (use your Anaheim or Poblano peppers)
3/4 teaspoon ground cumin
3 cup chicken broth
Salt and pepper

Heat the oil in a large heavy bottom saucepan over medium-low heat.  Add the salt pork and cook, stirring occasionally, until it gives up most of its fat and shrivels, about 5 minutes.  Add the onions and garlic and cook until they are soft and fragrant, about 3 minutes.  Add the flour, and stir to evenly coat the onion and pork.  Stir in the chile and the cumin and then whisk in the broth.   Bring to a bare simmer and cook, stirring frequently, for 30 minutes to thicken the sauce and cook out the flour flavor.  (Stir the bottom of the pan to prevent the flour from sticking and burning.)  Remove from heat.  Season with salt and pepper to taste.  This makes about 4 cup sauce.  Keep the sauce warm if using immediately, or cover and refrigerate up to 2 days. Warm the sauce before using.

Enchiladas and assembly:
3 c shredded cheese (preferably a mix of cheddar and jack)
3/4 cup finely diced white onion
Oil
12 corn tortillas
Green chile sauce (see above)
6 eggs, fried over-medium (optional)

1.  This works best if you set it up assembly-line fashion.  Combine the cheese and onion in a large bowl.  Have ready a large skillet to fry the tortillas and the saucepan of hot green chile sauce.  Heat the oven to 400 degrees.

2.  Heat 2 tablespoon oil in the large skillet over medium-high heat.  Fry a tortilla on both sides until it is puffy and slightly softened about 1 minute total.  Dip the fried tortilla in the chile sauce and place it on an oven proof plate.  Sprinkle over about 1/3 cup of cheese and spoon over a little more chile sauce.  Fry a second tortilla, dip it in the sauce and place it on top of the first prepared tortilla, top it with a fried egg (if using), then spoon over more chile sauce and cheese, to make one serving.  Repeat with remaining tortillas to make 6 servings.

3.  Place prepared plates in the oven and bake until the cheese melts, about 3 to 5 minutes.  Serve immediately.  (NOTE:  I melted the cheese by placing individual plate into the microwave….and then didn’t need to worry about whether my plates were oven proof or not)

Risotto with Tuscan Kale and Toasted Pumpkin Seeds (from Gourmet | September 2002 Recipe by Kemp Minifie)

Ingredients:

3 1/2 cups low-sodium fat-free chicken broth (can you vegetable broth)
3 1/2 cups water
1 teaspoon fine sea salt
3/4 pound Tuscan kale (also called black or lacinato kale)
1 1/4 cups finely chopped onion
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
3 garlic cloves, minced (I like risotto… with lots of garlic, so feel free to add more)
1 1/2 cups Arborio rice
1/3 cup dry white wine
1/2 cup grated Parmigiano-Reggiano
Accompaniment: toasted pumpkin seeds (or goat cheese)

Directions:

Bring broth and water to a boil with 3/4 teaspoon sea salt in a 3- to 4-quart saucepan. Meanwhile, cut stems and center ribs from kale and discard. Stir kale into broth in batches and simmer (all of kale), stirring occasionally, until tender, 5 to 10 minutes. Transfer kale with tongs to a large sieve set over a bowl and gently press on greens to extract more liquid. Add liquid in bowl to simmering broth and keep at a bare simmer, covered. Chop kale.

Cook onion in oil and 1 tablespoon butter with remaining 1/4 teaspoon sea salt in a wide 4-quart heavy pot, covered, over low heat, stirring occasionally, until softened, about 5 minutes. Increase heat to moderate, then add garlic and cook, uncovered, stirring, 1 minute. Add rice and cook, stirring, 1 minute.

Add wine and simmer briskly, stirring constantly, until absorbed. Stir in 1/2 cup simmering broth and simmer briskly, stirring constantly, until broth is absorbed. Continue simmering and adding broth, about 1/2 cup at a time, stirring constantly and letting each addition be absorbed before adding next, until rice is creamy-looking but still al dente (it should be the consistency of thick soup), 17 to 18 minutes. (There will be leftover broth.)

Stir in kale, cheese, and remaining tablespoon butter and cook, stirring, until heated through and butter is incorporated, about 1 minute. Season risotto with sea salt and pepper and, if desired, thin with some of remaining broth. Serve sprinkled with toasted pumpkin seeds.

October 5, 2009

5 Oct

Dear CSA members, 

Fall is here. I may have said it before, but now… I am convinced. My allergies are stirred up by the wind over the weekend and I find myself sipping a good amount of tea and honey. If you are finding the change of seasons affecting your allergies, I suggest introducing local honey into your diet. I am not a doctor or a scientist, but I hear from friends that local raw honey can help with seasonal allergies. You can pick up local San Marcos Farms honey at the Farm Stand if you want to try it out.

Pumpkins and popcorn have arrived! Please see the recipe section for tips on popping your own popcorn and toasting pumpkin seeds.

Also, I am happy to introduce you to our new Education Coordinator Shelley Gillespie. I asked her to tell you a bit about herself. She will be around the farm part time, so hope you enjoy getting to know her or even pick her brain on a tour.

Looking forward to wearing my scarves,

Jen Corey, Marketing Manager

Pre-used Paper Needed: Every day we print reports, documents, and newsletters on blank paper. Although we recycle, I feel it is not enough. We could be using “pre-used” or “scratch paper.” I am asking CSA members, to collect paper at home and work that has only been printed on one side and donate it to the farm. We take white or colored paper. Bring it by the paper bags or box loads. Drop off any time at CSA pick-up or the farm stand and it will make its way up to the office. Thank you in advance.

Meet Shelley:

I first found my passion for sustainable agriculture in Costa Rica where I co-founded a small, organic coffee farm (Sol Colibrí Coffee) that grew over eight years of dedication into an operation that processed, dried, roasted, exported and direct-marketed our coffee crop.  I have since worked for a collective CSA in Seattle, and on a family-run vegetable farm in Washington State. I received my BA from the Evergreen State College where I was a participant in the Practice in Sustainable Agriculture program. I am a creative writer with an interest in food crops native to the Americas, and enjoy getting around town by bike. Encouraging others’ enthusiasm, knowledge and thoughtfulness about all dimensions of growing and eating locally-produced food is one of my favorite endeavors.

I started at Fairview Gardens earlier this year in March, co-leading the educational tours with Tiffany Cooper. After spending three months in Spain this summer, I have returned to lead educational tours and outreach. In Spain I continued to be involved with sustainable agriculture and I had the opportunity to sell organic produce with two pioneering organic farmers at the Zaragoza farmers’ market.

I want to invite you as members of the Fairview Gardens CSA program to help me spread the word about our fabulous tours, tailored to both school groups and curious adults. Your help is greatly appreciated. This is an excellent opportunity to educate others about sustainable agriculture, local organic farms, and in particular the history of our farm. If you are part of a church group, book club, garden club please consider inviting your group for a guided tour of Fairview Gardens.

After months of a farm filled with kids during our summer farm camp, we miss having the curiosity and laughter of children. Tours are age-specific and would be beneficial for elementary school to college students. You can “cut and paste” this note into an email and pass it along to educators who may be interested:

Fairview Gardens Farm-to-School Tours allow students of all ages to recognize where food comes from while making the connection between food and well-being. On a tour I gave in May, a young girl had the thrill of tugging a carrot out of the ground, washing it, and eating it right in the field. She’d never seen a carrot growing before. While eating the carrot, she learned about the benefits of its nutrition for her body. This is the kind of experience we offer with farm-to-school tours. The Fairview Gardens outdoor classroom reinforces curriculum and offers an exciting, dynamic field trip. To schedule a tour please contact: Shelley@fairviewgardens.org.

Thank you and savor the flavors of early October!

Shelley Gillespie
Education Coordinator

Upcoming Events:

What: Fresh Greens; dance to the new green beat… SBCC Adult Education Class presented by The Sustainability Project; taught by CSA member and architect John Kelly

When: Tuesdays in October 2009, 5:30 – 7:00 pm

Where: The Faulkner Gallery, SB Central Library

Description: How can we thrive in a world of economic uncertainty, peak oil, and climate change? Hear personal stories about simple, affordable, everyday sustainable lifestyles and share your experiences with green living. Visit green homes and gardens.

Discuss how our ongoing crisis is an opportunity to create the next major green movement. For more information about each class see attached flyer or go to

http://www.sbcc.edu/adulted

Sneak Peek:

Small Share

Pumpkin (Take pictures of your jack-o-lanterns and email to post at the Farm Stand.)

Popcorn

Tomatoes

Cherry Tomatoes

Summer Squash          

Peppers

Arugula/Radish

Large Share

Pumpkin (Take pictures of your jack-o-lanterns and email to post at the Farm Stand.)

Popcorn

Tomatoes

Cherry Tomatoes

Summer Squash

Peppers

Radish

Arugula

Herbs

Garlic

Recipes (Send me your recipes. I love having CSA member contributions!):

Popcorn:

This corn is harvested when the kernels are hard and dry. Take time popping out the kernels while watching a movie (I like The Boys of Baraka, it has nothing to do with farming, but it’s still worth watching.) or at the beach during sunset. Heat oil in a good size saucepan. If you put a few in the pan, you will know when its ready because 2 will pop and then you can throw the rest in. Cover your pan, giving it a shake regularly so it doesn’t burn. When the popping slows down, you will know they are done; about 3 ½ minutes.

Fun seasoning variations:

  1. Parmesan with cracked pepper and other dried herbs is nice and savory
  2. Sugar for kettle corn
  3. Furikake (my favorite) which is a Japanese seasoning you can get in the Asian section of the grocery store.

Toasted Pumpkin Seeds:

Similar cooking method. Rinse pulp off seeds and dry overnight. Heat oil over moderate heat. Add seeds and stir constantly. You won’t need to cover the pan since the seeds won’t start jumping out like the popcorn. Seeds will puff out a little when they are done; about 5 minutes. 

Creative uses for your seeds:

  1. Season with chili or cayenne pepper, lime and salt and keep in a bowl at work for a healthy snack
  2. Add to salads and use for crunch instead of pine nuts or croutons
  3. Great as a topper of soups and chilies

Toasted Pita Sandwich (from CSA member Betsy Austin)

Simply drop sliced tomatoes, sprinkled with herbs or seasoning into whole wheat pita bread, add slice of cheese and drop into your toaster, either once or twice. Up pops a toasty melted yummy veggie sandwich! Enjoy. 

Poblano Corn Pudding (courtesy of CSA member Leslie Hui, from Food Network Chef Guy Fieri. See http://www.foodnetwork.com)

Ingredients:

3 poblano peppers

3 tablespoons unsalted butter

1 yellow onion, diced

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more for seasoning

1 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper, plus more for seasoning

2 cups whole milk

3 eggs

3 tablespoons sour cream

1 cup grated sharp white Cheddar

4 ears corn, shucked and kernels removed, about 4 to 5 cups

4 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves

4 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro leaves

1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper

2 cups panko bread crumbs

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

Put the poblano peppers over the flame of 1 of the burners on the stove to roast. Cook, turning often with tongs until all of the skin is blistered, about 15 minutes. Add the peppers to a bowl and cover with plastic wrap to steam for about 15 more minutes. When the peppers are cool enough to handle, transfer to a cutting board, peel the skin off, remove the seeds and stems, dice, and set aside.

Heat 1 tablespoon of the butter in a medium sauté pan over medium heat, add the onions and the salt and pepper. Cook until the onions are translucent, about 5 minutes, and then set aside to cool.

Heat the milk in a small saucepan just until it starts to simmer, about 3 minutes.

In a large bowl, whisk the eggs and then slowly add the scalded milk. Whisk in the sour cream and then fold in the cheese, corn, peppers, onions, herbs, cayenne. Season with salt and pepper, to taste.

Add the mixture to a 9 by 13-inch buttered baking dish and set aside. Put the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter in a medium sauté pan over medium heat and add the panko. Toss to coat the bread crumbs and season with salt and pepper. Pour the bread crumbs over the pudding and bake in the preheated oven until the bread crumbs are golden, the pudding is set and bubbling around the edges and a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean, about 25 minutes. Remove from the oven and serve. 8 to 10 servings