Archive | February, 2011

Spring is just around the corner!

28 Feb

Fairview Blossoms

CSA Potluck

Please come celebrate the end of the Winter Season CSA with us!

Fairview Gardens

March 12th

11:00 am – 1:00 pm

Bring your family or friends and a dish or beverage.

Please email any questions to Lisa:

csa@fairviewgardens.org

805-967-7369

*If you would like to sign up for your Spring Season CSA please click HERE.


Composting and Worm Bin Class/CSA Volunteer Day

Due to the rain we had to cancel both of our scheduled activities last Saturday, February 26th.  We will be re-scheduling the Composting and Worm Bin Class and as soon as we have confirmed the day we will update the website and blog.

CSA members please join us for the CSA Potluck March 12th.  This will be a great time to meet your fellow CSA members and maybe even swap some recipes.

See you on the farm!

Our Next Urban Homesteading Workshop

Garden Layout and Bed Prep:Intensive Gardening Strategies

March 26th

9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Shoulder-to-shoulder planting in deep bed prepared soil delivers more food per square foot than any system we’ve ever used. Roots grow down instead of out, so you can space plants closer together and still get high production.  In turn the close spacing shades out weeds, so they don’t become major problems as they do in a more open garden.

The system demands extra-deep soil preparation, done by creating lasagna garden beds.  The soil becomes incredibly fertile through layered preparation of carbon and nitrogen materials.

You will get hands on with this class learning how to prepare and grow a huge abundance of food.  This process is hard work to start but extremely rewarding!

Sneak Peek:

Lettuce

Carrots

Kale

Oranges

Green Garlic

Turnips

Collards

Cilantro

Recipe of the week:

Burnt-onion Collard Greens

¼ cup olive or coconut oil
1 large onion, finely chopped
½ cup chicken or vegetable broth
¼ cup dry white wine
salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 to 3 bunches of collard greens (about 1½ pounds), leaves only, washed well and chopped

In a heavy skillet, heat the oil slowly over medium-high heat and fry the onion until well browned and blackened a bit around the edges.

Stir in the broth, wine, and salt and pepper to taste, and mix well before adding the chopped greens.

Cook, stirring occasionally, until the greens are tender, 30 to 40 minutes.

Serves 4 to 6.

*Recipe from Seed to Skillet by Jimmy Williams and Susan Heeger

Chips

Chips the Farm Dog

Please send Chips healing thoughts.  He had a cancerous growth on his tail that required surgery.  He is at home but in pain.  Lets help him out and wish him a speedy recovery. He is such a good dog.

Love you Chips!

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Spring Break Camp and DIY Urban Homesteading

21 Feb

Turnip Tots

Spring Break Camp

TURNIP TOPS

ages 3 – 5 years

March 28-April 1, 9am-2pm  $300

Spring is an exciting time on the farm.  Spend a week harvesting strawberries, feeding the goats and playing with chickens as we explore farm life.

Our experienced staff will weave nature, art, cooking and stories into playful and meaningful adventures.

Contact Mark@fairviewgardens.org for more information.

Urban Homesteading Workshop #3:

Composting and Worm Bins

February 26, 9am-5pm

This class will teach the basics behind composting and worm bins.  You will see everything from big tractor compost piles, to worm bins that will fit under the sink of your apartment.

Composting is the basis for growing the healthiest, most nutritious, and most disease-resistant plants.  This composting method is simple and effective.  it is so fun and satisfying that we must warn you composting can become addictive!

Learn how to create a worm system to recycle food waste, produce rich organic castings (compost) for the garden, cultivate fish bait, and potentially reduce your garbage bill. This course will teach you how to setup and maintain a worm bin.

You will have the chance to purchase a starter worm bin or compost bin during this class.

Here is a full calendar of our Urban Homesteading Series just encase you have missed it:

The Urban Homesteading Series
Date
Class
Time Cost
January 22 Beekeeping #1: Introduction to Bee Keeping – CLASS FULL 9 am to 5 pm $85
February 12 Planning a Garden throughout the year 9 am to 12 pm $40
February 26 Composting and Worm Bins 9 am to 5 pm $85
March 26 Garden Layout and Bed Prep: Intensive Gardening Strategies 9 am to 5 pm $85
April 16 Do it Yourself Greywater systems 9 am to 5 pm $85
April 30 Sheet Mulching – The Lazy Gardener’s Guide to Growing 9 am to 5 pm $85
May 14 Wild Fermenting #1 9 am to 5 pm $85
May 21 Backyard Chickens 9 am to 5 pm $85
June 4 & 5 Introduction to Permaculture: 2 Day program Two full days $195
June 11 Beekeeping #2: Care of the Hive 9 am to 5 pm $85
June 18 Container Gardening – Gardening for small spaces 9 am to 12 pm $40
July 23 Preserving the Harvest #1 9 am to 12 pm $40
August 20 Preserving the Harvest #2 9 am to 12 pm $40
September 17 Preserving the Harvest #3 9 am to 12 pm $40
September 24 Soap Making 9 am to 12 pm $40
October 15 From Yard to Skillet – Processing your own chickens 9 am to 5 pm $85
October 22 Composting and Worm Bins 9 am to 5 pm $85
November 12 Holiday Craft Fair: Make your own gifts 9 am to 5 pm TBD
November 19 Grow your own Bread 9 am to 5 pm $85
 
 

Sneak Peek:

Fennel

Kohlrabi

Lettuce                                   

Beets                          

Chard                         

Bok Choy                   

Apples

Here are a few simple recommendations from Farmer Toby on ways to prepare Fennel and Kohlrabi.  Slice Fennel thin, then coat with 
olive oil, salt, pepper and bake until crispy. 

Remove tough outer skin of the Kohlrabi enjoy the white flesh inside.
Great cut up raw into salads.

Bok Choy is perfect for Stir Fry’s!

This Weeks Recipe’s:

 
Ingredients:
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon coarse-grained mustard
  • 3 tablespoons finely chopped fresh parsley leaves
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 bunches kohlrabi (about 2 pounds), bulbs peeled and cut into julienne strips, stems discarded, and the leaves reserved for another use
  • 1  apple

Prep:

In a bowl whisk the cream until it holds soft peaks and whisk in the lemon juice, the mustard, the parsley, the sugar, and salt and pepper to taste. Stir in the kohlrabi strips and the apple, peeled, cored, and diced, and combine the salad well.

 

bbcgoodfood.com

Baked salmon with fennel & tomatoes

Serves 2

Preparation and cooking times

Prep 20 mins
 
Cook 25 mins

Gluten-free, Egg-free, Super healthy, Heart healthy, Dairy-free, Nut-free

Instruction

  1. 1.  Heat oven to 350 degrees. 4. Trim the fronds from the fennel and set aside. Cut the fennel bulbs in half, then cut each half into 3 wedges. Cook in boiling salted water for 10 mins, then drain well. Chop the fennel fronds roughly, then mix with the parsley and lemon zest.
  2. Spread the drained fennel over a shallow ovenproof dish, then add the tomatoes. Drizzle with olive oil, then bake for 10 mins. Nestle the salmon among the veg, sprinkle with lemon juice, then bake 15 mins more until the fish is just cooked. Scatter over the parsley and serve.

BYOB

CSA Volunteer Day

February 26, 2011  

8:00- 12:00pm

Will be cancelled if it is Raining.

Please email csa@fairviewgardens.org if you have any questions.

 

 

 

HAPPY URBAN HOMESTEADING TO ALL!

Lisa 

 

Happy Love your Farmer Day!

14 Feb

 

Celebrate Love your Farmer Day: Slow Food USA

Do you love your farmer? We do! And so do Food & Water Watch & the Rural Advancement Foundation International. That’s why they’ve renamed Valentine’s Day.

This year February 14th is no longer “Valentines’ Day,” but Love your Farmer Day,  in support of the family farmers who raise our poultry. They need our help, so before we head out to buy teddy bears and chocolate hearts or make dinner for our loved ones, we’re calling the White House to demand that the USDA level the playing field for these farmers.

Won’t you join us?

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) is taking too long to implement rules that would level the playing field for small poultry farmers – it would protect them from big companies that force them to work harder for less and severely limits their options in raising and selling their livestock. 

On Valentine’s Day, Monday February 14th, please take 2 minutes to call the White House and tell President Obama to level the playing field for poultry farmers.

Here’s how you do it: 

  • Call 202-456-1111 to reach the White House Comment Line  
  • Wait for an operator to take your message  
  • Tell the operator that you want President Obama to ensure that the USDA implements the livestock and poultry rule. Here’s a sample of what you can say:
  • HI! Happy Love Your Farmer Day! I’m  ________ (name) from _________ (city and state or state) calling in support of the USDA’s livestock and poultry rule.  Please tell President Obama to make sure that the USDA puts this rule into practice, so that our poultry farmers have a level playing field. Thanks!  

    Tell us how it went by leaving a comment below.

    Want some more info about the rule, which you may have heard referred to as the GIPSA rule, and what it would do for poultry farmers? Read below:

    1. Allows family farmers and ranchers to find out what prices and terms of sale are being offered for livestock.
    2. Increases and ensures better market access for family farm livestock producers;
    3. Identifies violations and leads to improved enforcement and curtailment of the most abusive and unfair procurement practices used by corporate meatpackers.
    4. Stops a common practice that allows packers to avoid competitive bidding in the marketplace, keeping open market prices artificially low.
    5. Prevents meat packers from paying large volume producers higher prices simply based on the number of animals they deliver without offering the same prices to groups of producers who could collectively deliver the same number of animals.
    6. Prevents packers from offering favorable price premiums to a few preferred producers without offering them to other producers who could meet the same standards.

    This article is from the SLOW FOOD USA Blog publish 02/14/11

    Sneak Peek:

    Kale                            

    Chard                          

    Green Garlic                

    Lettuce                        

    Beets                          

    Turnips            

    Red Cabbage             

    Apples

    Weekly Recipe:

    organicauthority.com

    Today’s recipe for Beet and Red Cabbage Salad doubles up on nutrient-rich vegetables: pickled beets and sweet-and-sour red cabbage. Finish the dish with crispy tart apples and crunchy toasted pecans. 

    Prep time is 15 minutes, cook time is 10 minutes, and all of the ingredients should be available at a well-stocked natural and organic food store. 

    Note: You may substitute pears for the apples or walnuts for the pecans. For added flavor and richness, sprinkle the finished salad with crumbled goat cheese or blue cheese. 

    Beet and Red Cabbage Salad 

    Makes 6 servings (about 3/4 cup each)

    1 jar (16 ounces) picked beets, whole or sliced
    1 jar (16 ounces) sweet-and-sour red cabbage
    1/3 cup red currant jelly
    1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
    1/4 cup thinly sliced green onions
    1 cup chopped Granny Smith apple (about 1 small apple)
    1/2 cup chopped toasted pecans (see toasting instructions at end of article)
    Salt and pepper, to taste

    1. Drain beets and cabbage, combining both liquids in a small bowl.
    2. Pour 1/2 cup of the combined liquids into a small saucepan; discard remainder. Add red currant jelly and cloves to saucepan; whisk to combine. Bring to a boil; reduce heat and simmer until liquid is thickened and reduced to 1/3 cup, about 10 minutes. Cool.
    3. Meanwhile, cut sliced beets in half (or whole beets into wedges). Toss beets, cabbage and green onions with cooled red currant dressing.
    4. Just before serving, stir in apple and pecans. Season to taste with salt and pepper. 

    To Toast Pecans: In preheated 350°F oven, bake nuts in a single layer on a rimmed baking sheet until they’re fragrant, about 5 to 8 minutes. Remove from baking sheet; cool. 

    Upcoming Events

    Composting and Worm Bins

    February 26 9 am to 5 pm  85.00

    This class will teach the basics behind composting and worm bins.  You will see everything from big tractor compost piles, to worm bins that will fit under the sink of your apartment. 

    Composting is the basis for growing the healthiest, most nutritious, and most disease-resistant plants.  This composting method is simple and effective.  it is so fun and satisfying that we must warn you composting can become addictive!

    Learn how to create a worm system to recycle food waste, produce rich organic castings (compost) for the garden, cultivate fish bait, and potentially reduce your garbage bill. This course will teach you how to set up and maintain a worm bin.

    You will have the chance to purchase a starter worm bin or compost bin during this class.

     Class Taught by:

    Elisa “Worm Girl” Robles & Whitney Bell

    Whitney Bell

     Whitney is an avid gardener and composter. She is inspired by the resilience and intelligence of natural systems. She received her first Permaculture Design Certificate (PDC) in 2009 at Quail Springs Learning Oasis in Cuyama, California. Here, she continued to study through the Garden Internship Program. During this time, she learned Soil Foodweb composting science with Dr. Elaine Ingam. In 2010, she followed her passion for sustainable systems design to Chiapas, Mexico, where she underwent a second PDC course. She continues to work and volunteer with various farms and gardening projects. Whitney will be traveling to Australia in October for an intensive internship in sustainable systems design at Zaytuna Farm. 

     

    BYOB

    CSA Volunteer Work Day

    February 26th

    8:00 am – noon

    Bring Your Own Bucket

    We’ve got the compost but not a proper spreading machine.  Help us spread the compost.  Bring your gloves, water and a bucket or shovel, rake, wheelbarrow any tool you think would be helpful to spread compost. 

    Come get your hands dirty and help Fairview Gardens spread compost.

    If you have any questions please send us an email csa@fairviewgardens.org

    Happy Love your Farmer Day!

    Lisa

    Composting and Worm Bins

    7 Feb

    February Urban Homesteading Classes:

    Planning a  Garden Throughout the Year

    February 12th     9:00 am – Noon     $40.00

    Composting and Worm Bins

    February 26th     9:00 am – 5:00 pm     $85.00

    Eliza "Worm Girl" Robles Photo Courtosy of Leslie Hotzman Photography

    This class will teach the basics behind composting and worm bins.  You will see everything from big tractor compost piles, to worm bins that will fit under the sink of your apartment.

    Composting is the basis for growing the healthiest, most nutritious, and most disease-resistant plants.  This composting method is simple and effective.  it is so fun and satisfying that we must warn you composting can become addictive!

    Learn how to create a worm system to recycle food waste, produce rich organic castings (compost) for the garden, cultivate fish bait, and potentially reduce your garbage bill. This course will teach you how to setup and maintain a worm bin.

    You will have the chance to purchase a starter worm bin or compost bin during this class.

    Sneak Peek:

    Oranges

    Lettuce

    Arugula

    Spinach

    Beets

    Collards or Chard

    Radish

    Apples

    Organic Beet Dip Recipe

    • 1 large beet or 2 medium sized beets {I used 1 large red beet and 1 small golden beet together}
    • 2 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped {depending on how strong your garlic is}
    • 6 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
    • 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
    • 1 teaspoon cumin seeds
    • sea salt
    • fresh ground pepper

    Method

    First, drizzle some olive oil into a saute pan with 1 chopped garlic clove, cumin seeds, sprinkle of sea salt and some fresh ground pepper to taste. Lightly toast the garlic and cumin seeds on medium to low heat, about 5 minutes. Set aside. Instead of this step you can use 2 tablespoons of tahini, but making everything from scratch always tastes better!

    Next, get your steamer out and cube the beets but leave the skins on. Add the beets to the steam and steam until soft, about 15 minutes. You can also roast the beets instead to add a different flavor to the beet dip, although I have not tried this yet.

    Transfer the beets to a food processor and add the rest of the garlic, 6 tablespoons of olive oil and the cumin / garlic mixture. Mix in food processor until smooth. Then add vinegar, 1 teaspoon of sea salt and 1/2 teaspoon of pepper {or to taste}. Mix again until ingredients are blended. Taste and add more salt or pepper if you like.

    You can also add the juice of 1 lemon if you like.

    Enjoy!

    Recipe from: http://www.heidihillyard.com

    Organic Beet Dip